Foster Family Service's Pages

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

We should all say and hear these!

I like it when you try so hard... Let's talk about it... Thanks for being patient… I'm lucky to know you… You're a great kid... Thanks for helping... I'm sorry... You're special… I Love You

Friday, May 20, 2011

It's Getting Hot Out There!

• Apply sunscreen at least 30 minutes before going outside, and use sunscreen even on cloudy days. The SPF should be at least 15. Be sure to apply enough sunscreen - about one ounce per sitting for a young adult. Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.
• Make sure the life jacket is the right size for your child. The jacket should not be loose. It should always be worn as instructed with all straps belted. Blow-up water wings, toys, rafts, and air mattresses should never be used as life jackets or life preservers
• Five gallon buckets pose a drowning hazard for young children, especially those between 7 years and 15 months of age.
• Before prolonged physical activity, the child should be well-hydrated. During the activity, periodic drinking should be enforced, eg, each 20 minutes, 5 oz of cold tap water or a flavored sports drink for a child weighing 88 lbs, and 9 oz for an adolescent weighing 132 lbs, even if the child does not feel thirsty. Avoid caffeine, it dehydrates the body.
• In the event of a power outage/rotating blackout, consider going to a cool public building, or driving in an air-conditioned vehicle.
• Cars get hot fast! In 2008, at least 42 children across the United States died from heat stroke caused by being left or trapped in a vehicle.

Friday, May 13, 2011

What is ILP?

Each state has an Independent Living Program (sometimes called an ILP). It's just for current and former foster youth, and it gives you access to lots of support and services.

Why should I sign up?

Once you're enrolled in the ILP, you can get lots of free stuff. Like help finding a job, money for school, help finding your first apartment, even $$$ to help pay your rent starting out!

Free stuff? What's the catch?

Sometimes you are required to attend classes. But they're free, too, and usually they're pretty helpful.

Who can sign up?

The "Independent Living Program" (ILP) is available in all California counties, which serves youth aged 16-18 in foster care and also helps emancipated foster youth up to age 21. Even if you have already left foster care (or even if you ran away), you are probably still eligible. If you are still in foster care, ask your caseworker about signing up. Even if you have already left foster care (or even if you ran away), you are probably still eligible. If you are still in foster care, ask your caseworker about signing up.

http://www.fosteryouthhelp.ca.gov/Indep.html

Monday, May 9, 2011

When attending FFS functions don’t forget to network. Introduce yourself and get to know the foster parents in your area. Use these contacts not only for moral support, but for babysitting and respite.
Trading babysitting is the best way to get that much needed night out, even if it’s only for an hour or two. How about:



  • Visiting a local farmers market

  • Have a sunset dinner

  • Talk over iced coffee

  • Take a nature hike

  • Enjoy a moonlit stroll

  • Treat yourself to desert

  • See a non-animated movie!

Thursday, May 5, 2011

May is National Foster Care Month

May is National Foster Care Month, the perfect time to thank you for everything you do year round on behalf of California’s children and families.

As you know, foster families, relative caregivers, mentors, advocates, social workers and volunteers provide safe, stable and nurturing environments for children and youth in foster care until they can either safely reunite with their parents or establish other lifelong family relationships. Your caring commitment is critical for ending the cycles of neglect, abuse or other family crisis issues that often prevent a child from reaching his or her full potential. We truly appreciate your dedication and hope you recognize, as we do, the valuable role you play in building brighter futures for America’s next generation.
Thank you for your continuing support. It is through the positive efforts of people like you that we can Change a Lifetime for a child in need.

Monday, May 2, 2011

Summer Safety Tips

  • Apply sunscreen at least 30 minutes before going outside, and use sunscreen even on cloudy days. The SPF should be at least 15. Be sure to apply enough sunscreen - about one ounce per sitting for a young adult. Reapply sunscreen every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.
  • Make sure the life jacket is the right size for your child. The jacket should not be loose. It should always be worn as instructed with all straps belted. Blow-up water wings, toys, rafts, and air mattresses should never be used as life jackets or life preservers
  • Five gallon buckets pose a drowning hazard for young children, especially those between 7 years and 15 months of age.
  • Before prolonged physical activity, the child should be well-hydrated. During the activity, periodic drinking should be enforced, eg, each 20 minutes, 5 oz of cold tap water or a flavored sports drink for a child weighing 88 lbs, and 9 oz for an adolescent weighing 132 lbs, even if the child does not feel thirsty. Avoid caffeine, it dehydrates the body.
  • In the event of a power outage/rotating blackout, consider going to a cool public building, or driving in an air-conditioned vehicle.
  • In 2008, at least 42 children across the United States died from heat stroke caused by being left or trapped in a vehicle.

Never leave children alone in or around cars because:
  • Even on a mild day at 73 degrees outside, an SUV can heat up to 100 degrees in 10 minutes, to 120 in just 30 minutes. As the outdoor temperature rises, so does the buildup of heat within a vehicle. At 90 degrees outside, the vehicle can heat up to 160 degrees within just a few minutes.
  • Cracking the window to let air in does very little to protect kids from the effects of heat buildup in a parked car. When the outside temperature is 93 degrees with a window down 1 inch, the temperature inside a car may reach 125 degrees in just 20 minutes and approximately 140 degrees in 40 minutes.
  • Heat exhaustion can occur at temperatures above 90 degrees and heat stroke can occur when temperatures rise above 105 degrees. If not treated immediately, heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke.
  • Children can set the vehicle in motion
  • Your child can be abducted

Friday, April 29, 2011

Ways to Show Children You Care

* Notice them... get caught staring at them-even throw in a wink.
* Answer their questions with full attention at eye level.
* Create traditions and fight for them.
* Laugh at their jokes.
* Include them in your jokes.
* Smile a lot
* Acknowledge them with a heartfelt "Good morning!" and a "Hi!" when you see them.
* Discuss their dreams
* Be relaxed in their presence. Just sit with them.
* Say their names.
* Contribute to their collections.
* Hide surprises for them to find.
* Kneel, squat, sit so that you are at their eye level.
* Go and find them at unexpected times.
* Play outside together.
* Surprise them.
* Remember their birthdays and other significant days in their lives. (This was the day that you took your first step, trip to the doctor, etc.)
* Ask them about themselves.
* When they ask your advice give them options.
* Listen to the answers.
* Stay with them when they are afraid.